Back to Top

The Gazette

Colorado Springs, Colo.

By Philip Mella

February 27, 2019

I agree with Jeff Cahill that this president is different, but not for the same reasons he does (“This president is different,” Letters, Feb 24). Let’s conduct the thought experiment Cahill suggests, that Jeb Bush, not Donald Trump had won the election. In that case, he suggests, the acrimony over Hillary Clinton’s loss wouldn’t have happened.

But, in all likelihood, the following wouldn’t have either: two Constitutional constructionists on the Supreme Court, profound tax and regulatory reform, China seriously considering abandoning their decades-long intellectual property theft and grossly imbalanced trade agreements, the abrogation of the Iran deal which put the world’s largest state sponsor of terrorism in control of its nuclear destiny, Kim Jung Un making meaningful opening concessions, at least creating the possibility of a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula, record-low unemployment, including Black Americans and Hispanics, 3 percent GDP, the reanimation of our military to guarantee we’re the preeminent force on the global stage, twice enforcing the gas attack red line in Syria, and arming the Ukrainians against Vladimir Putin’s depredations.

So, yes, I too find Trump’s tweeting and impetuous management style disturbing, but when compared with what he’s accomplished in just two years, it’s something I’m willing to tune out for the sake of a much stronger economic and national security future.

 

The Gazette

Colorado Springs, Colo.

By Philip Mella

September 14, 2018

I’m sure I’m not alone in confessing that I choked up as I read your poignant column juxtaposing the craven cynicism of Colin Kaepernick and Nike with the selfless dedication of our first responders (“Nike and Kaepernick should thank cops,” The Gazette’s Viewpoint, Sept 11).

For reasons best left to cultural anthropologists to parse traditional values in America have become inverted.  For those who willfully ignore or never learned our exceptional history, we have been a nation that regardless of differences stood shoulder to shoulder with law enforcement.  Indeed, there was a tacit, universal respect for the sacrifices they made and dangers they faced on our behalf, and there was an explicit shame on anyone who maligned that respect.

In contrast, today we must suffer the ignorant, adolescent displays of those convinced that racism is rampant and that there is widespread corruption among our law enforcement officers.  Although we can’t know the hearts of those who advance such obviously misinformed beliefs we must reject them as illegitimate and culturally corrosive.

I’m also certain that many Americans long for a return to culturally cohesive times, when there was nationwide agreement that our imperfect experiment in self-governance is, in truth, the preeminent example of justice the world has ever known.

 

The Gazette

Colorado Springs, Colo.

By Philip Mella

September 3, 2018

Perfectly aligned with the mainstream media’s flawed understanding of President Donald Trump’s overarching strategy, The Washington Examiner misses the underlying genius of the president’s animal cunning (“Hurrah for president’s new bond with Mexico,” Our Viewpoint, Aug 30).

The Examiner states that “Trump will deserve a lot of credit if he can get free trade talks back on track…”; in fact, they have always been on track, just not in the prosaic, conventional way trade talks have unproductively proceeded in recent administrations.  Recall that Trump’s caustic, disruptive approach to trade negotiations caused seismic tremors among pundits on both sides of the aisle, naively convinced that his first salvo was ill-informed and constituted the sum of his strategic thinking.

Now the likes of Mexico and the EU are actively discussing trade agreements that include concessions that a year ago would be called chimerical.  Indeed, if the deal with Mexico comes to fruition they will effectively pay for the wall.  Moreover, Trump now has Canada’s Trudeau facing possible excommunication from NAFTA unless he too acquiesces on tariffs.  China, the world’s de facto trade pariah, will be the next domino to fall as it finds itself hermetically sealed off from all major trading nations. 

Finally, the editorial masterfully misconstrues Trump’s ostensibly “misguided and harsh trade measures that wound all sides” as blunders when they were merely posturing feints that produced their intended results—serial capitulations from nations that self-interestedly want to maintain the status quo, that critics ignorantly called trading “partners.”

 

The Gazette

Colorado Springs, CO

By Philip Mella

August 18, 2018

In a classic case of man bites dog the parents of students in Monument are concerned that their teacher Chris Jeub may try to “impart his Christian views on students” (“Ex-reality TV star as teacher riles Monument parents,” Aug 15).

Endless studies have thoroughly documented the incontestable fact that secular humanism—atheism’s latest euphemism—is rife in our public school system.  Without a hint of irony and even less evidence it presumes omniscience on everything from sex education to global warming, and has, if you will, a nearly religious fidelity to liberalism.

Yet we’re instructed to discount our fears that the legions of liberals teaching our susceptible young minds might not be scrupulously checking their politics at the school door.  Now comes a teacher with solid credentials but which includes an unapologetic Christian pedigree and the good parents of Monument have broken out the rhetorical pitchforks.

We’re in the final phase of liberal indoctrination in our public schools which means the pretense of objectivity in teaching has finally been deemed expendable.  The question is at what cost to our children?

 

The Gazette

Colorado Springs, Colo.

By Philip Mella

July 27, 2019

It's ironic that on the opposite page of Deborah Griffin's letter arguing for more gun control appeared Walter Williams' column in which he observed that "In Chicago, one person is shot every four hours and murdered every 18 hours," (Letters, Gun violence doesn't go away," Opinion, "Setting priorities in high crime areas," July 24).

Chicago has some of the most stringent gun laws yet it's among the most violent cities in our nation.  To what do liberals attribute this?  Williams writes, "The uninformed blame today's chaos on discrimination and poverty. That doesn't even pass the smell test, unless one wants to argue that historically there was less racial discrimination and poverty than today."

When apologists for gun control such as Griffin say the magic words, "common sense" related to gun legislation we know it's code for the narrow edge of a wedge that leads to the left's pipe dream of confiscation.  They're always looking in all the wrong places for the cause of gun violence, so I'll give them a clue:  it's not the millions of law-abiding citizens who own the majority of guns, it's the fraction of lawbreakers who are absolutely indifferent to gun laws--and always will be.

As for the Red Flag law which the writer mentions:  in their thoroughly misguided quest for heaven on earth the left's passion for incrementally nullifying our Constitutional rights is clearly limitless. Our rights are God-given and unalienable, which means they can't be legislated away.

The obvious answer to the problems of gun violence is to recognize how the cultural anarchy that's evolved over the past half century has led to the collective conclusion that traditional notions of right and wrong are no longer applicable to our Brave New World.  But that's apparently too obvious for our liberal brethren.

 

The Gazette

Colorado Springs, Colo.

By Philip Mella

July 16, 2019

A simple solution to the problem of our overwhelmed immigration detention system is for those wishing to enter our country to obey our laws ("Nation's harsh immigration policies also felt in Colorado," Guest Opinion, July 12).  A related article on impending ICE raids elicited predictable outcries from the liberal pantheon of presidential candidates ("Denver braces for ICE raids").

Apparently the U.S. is alone among nations that can enforce their immigration laws without a chorus of condemnation by those supporting illegal behavior.  Liberals at once decry our "broken" immigration system but their Congressional representatives consistently fail to take action to reform it.  So people flock to our nation knowing the risks to themselves and children, and when the system becomes inundated, which is inevitable, the left excoriates for its inhumane treatment of illegals.

The vast majority of Americans are charitable when it comes to assisting those in need, but we can and should to reject the notion that those who willfully break our laws deserve the same rights and economic support as fellow citizens.  The left's support for illegal immigration perfectly reflects their globalist, no-border philosophy which is antagonistic to American sovereignty--yet another concept they believe is no longer applicable to their misinformed view that all nations and cultures are on the same moral plane.

 

The Gazette

Colorado Springs, Colo.

By Philip Mella

June 7, 2019

George Will continues his serial attacks on President Donald Trump by writing that he was elected because "many millions of Americans enjoy his boorishness." ("Exploring the unique idea of an aesthetic impeachment," Opinion, June 4).

In Will's political universe, where manners supersede results, decorum is a supreme virtue whereas candor bordering on rudeness is a kind of mortal sin.  The outcome is a mediocre steady state where blue-collar workers are an economic asterisk and quarterly profits reign supreme.  That governing sensibility has also produced permanent trade deficits, a porous border serving businesses that demand low-wage workers, and the subjugation American interests on the global stage, from acquiescing to North Korea to blithely accepting a multilateral deal that effectively puts nuclear weapons in the hands of the Iranian mullahs.

There's nothing about Trump we know today that we didn't when he was campaigning--he's a brash New York real estate developer who's quick to take off the gloves of civil discourse and drop the false smiles of diplomacy.  I can guarantee you that had Jeb Bush been elected the ship of state would neatly comport with the Wills of America, which means there would be no challenges to Statist government and rule by Federal Register, no change to our tax code that punishes work and investment, and America would have remained an emasculated player on the world stage.

So, which would you prefer, kid gloves or boxing gloves?

 

The Gazette

Colorado Springs, Colo.

By Philip Mella

February 27, 2019

I agree with Jeff Cahill that this president is different, but not for the same reasons he does (“This president is different,” Letters, Feb 24). Let’s conduct the thought experiment Cahill suggests, that Jeb Bush, not Donald Trump had won the election. In that case, he suggests, the acrimony over Hillary Clinton’s loss wouldn’t have happened.

But, in all likelihood, the following wouldn’t have either: two Constitutional constructionists on the Supreme Court, profound tax and regulatory reform, China seriously considering abandoning their decades-long intellectual property theft and grossly imbalanced trade agreements, the abrogation of the Iran deal which put the world’s largest state sponsor of terrorism in control of its nuclear destiny, Kim Jung Un making meaningful opening concessions, at least creating the possibility of a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula, record-low unemployment, including Black Americans and Hispanics, 3 percent GDP, the reanimation of our military to guarantee we’re the preeminent force on the global stage, twice enforcing the gas attack red line in Syria, and arming the Ukrainians against Vladimir Putin’s depredations.

So, yes, I too find Trump’s tweeting and impetuous management style disturbing, but when compared with what he’s accomplished in just two years, it’s something I’m willing to tune out for the sake of a much stronger economic and national security future.

 

The Gazette

Colorado Springs, Colo.

By Philip Mella

June 8, 2018

A subtle but important nuance concerning California Democrats’ one-party hegemony was predictably lost in the article concerning its evolving political landscape (“Calif. primary could set stage for midterms,” June 5).

Twice the article referenced Republicans’ diminishing fortunes due to the state becoming “more diverse.”

Swimming in the mainstream media’s ocean of identity politics the AP reflexively equates ethnic and racial diversity with diversity of thought, when nothing could be further from the truth.

In fact, as ethnic minorities flooded the state it has become substantially more ideologically monochromatic, that is, less diverse in the manner most critical to the human condition — the universe of ideas. The threat to civil society rises when intellectually inbred thinking seeps into the groundwater of our culture.

Ironically, our Founding Fathers were far more intellectually curious and diverse than the Democratic Party, which is striving to become a hermetically sealed kingdom, walled off from the great unwashed masses of mainstream Americans.

Indeed, as we approach the midterms it’s becoming clear that the left has unwittingly painted itself into an ideological corner, a politically lonely place whose only comfort is the numbing echo of its voice.

 

The Gazette

Colorado Springs, Colo.

By Philip Mella

December 27, 2019

It's difficult to understand the historical lens that George Davis is using in his distorted appraisal of the boomer generation ("Seeing hope in the next generation," Letters, Dec 25).

His litany of apologies to the next generation has no foundation in fact.  The planet, in particular America, has never been freer of noxious pollutants, and the fractional change in global temperatures can be blamed on China and India, not boomers.  The homeless and hungry have never been better cared for, and a glimpse at the destitution in Dickens' poignant novella, "A Christmas Carol," when deplorable want was widespread will convince you of that truth.

His other criticisms, infrastructure, debt, self-serving politicians, and greed, reflect the fact that human nature is immutable.  Indeed, from the Roman Empire to America, elected officials faithfully reflect the citizens' cultural, civic, and moral values. 

There is, however, a legitimate criticism of the boomer generation which is arguably more profound.  It inherited economic, civic, and geopolitical stability, but allowed our moral and cultural inheritance to be squandered.  That has put us on a glide-path to a future where a kind of morally astringent secularism reigns uncontested.  We're left with a hollow shell of the moral certitude the Founding Fathers contemplated, that is, one nation, under God.

It's a decidedly antagonistic cultural landscape sans the tacit agreement in the superiority of American exceptionalism, where liberty and the rule of law combine to provide unprecedented opportunities to achieve the American dream, which is still the envy of the civilized world.

 

The Gazette

Colorado Springs, Colo.

By Philip Mella

May 11, 2018

What’s astonishing about the nuclear accord with Iran is not that President Donald Trump honored his pledge to withdraw from it, but the fact that four major nations were sufficiently naive to sign it. (“US leaving Iran nuclear deal, A1, May 9).

The Obama administration ignorantly believed it could leverage nuclear production concessions from the mullahs by removing the sanctions, allowing Iran to determine the sites where inspectors are permitted, providing no check on its ballistic missile program, and gifting them billions of dollars.

The result was predictable: Iran used the cash to expand its reign of terror in Syria and Yemen, while increasing its work on ballistic missiles; moreover, Iran’s nuclear program is likely on track for break-out in a few years because they preselect inspection sites.

The article adroitly moves from reporting to editorializing, opining that nations “cannot expect lasting U.S. fidelity to international agreements it signs,” which conveniently overlooks the fact that the deal was among leaders of nations — it wasn’t sanctioned by the nations’ legislative bodies.

Indeed, the reason this is a “deal,” not a treaty is because former President Obama was acutely aware there was no chance it would receive Senate approval.

In contrast to Obama’s statement that the withdrawal “risks eroding America’s credibility,” in truth it provides convincing evidence to the likes of Kim Jong Un that he’s now dealing with a president who won’t tolerate tyrants with nuclear weapons on the world stage.


Philip Mella
Powered by CampaignPartner.com - Political Websites
Close Menu